• Learning Resources for KIBE Families

    The KIBE School District remains dedicated to ensuring educational excellence for every student. During this school closure, our hope is that learning will continue, particularly in the core academic areas. This is not a replacement for classroom instruction. These activities are not required, and they will not be graded.

    The following list of suggested learning opportunities was developed considering a variety of students, including students with IEPs and students who do not have access to technology or other resources. These opportunities are examples of extended learning activities. There are many great resources to help students to stay engaged academically while at home.

    Below are some general learning opportunities for students and families to consider while away from school. These suggested learning extensions are optional and will not affect students’ grades or ability to complete the semester.

     

    • Grades K-2

    Reading

      • Have your student read a “just right” book daily for 15-30 minutes
      • Read aloud to your student and ask comprehension questions such as:
        • What are you picturing as you read/hear this text?
        • What are you wondering about?
        • What has happened so far? / What have you learned so far?
      • English Learners: Continue to speak, read and write in the language that is most comfortable at home.

    Writing

      • After reading a book or portion of a book, select one prompt to respond to:
        • Write about what happened in the story.
        • Write about your favorite part and tell why you selected that part.
        • Write about what might happen next in the story.
        • Write a story.

    Mathematics

    This is a great time to share with your student that math is everywhere. K-2 students should spend 10 minutes/day for math games and/or workbook practice.

      • Count Everything: Counting is a powerful activity that students can do anywhere.
      • Count in different ways, by 2’s, 5’s, 10’s. Start counting from different numbers, not just at zero. Celebrate landmark numbers – Clap or jump when you get to multiples of 10 like 10, 20, 30 etc.
      • Play store! Count while you stock shelves or exchange and count pretend money.
      • Talk about Shapes: Find, classify and sort shapes in your home. How many circles can you find, how many rectangles – and how many of those are squares.
      • Measure everything. Use nonstandard tools like a shoe or even your hand to measure how tall a table is or how far you can jump.
      • Point out fractions – share things - like a can of soup - between people. Each person gets a 1/2 or 1/3. Note how this new kind of number is less than one but more than none!
      • Read Stories! Mathematize reading time. Most children’s books are ripe with opportunities to notice shapes, count objects, compare two things, notice how things change and grow, and to make predictions about what is going to happen based on the information we already have!
      • Look at coins and determine how old they are using the date. Sort them from oldest to newest coin. If you have a large collection of coins arrange them into a bar graph based on year or the location, they were minted. What is the most common date or location?

    Science

      • Go outside and make observations. Look for evidence of animal habitats (i.e.: spider webs, bird nests, animal tracks, or leaves with insect bite marks, etc.)
      • Look for evidence of spring in the plants (i.e.: flowers, buds, new leaves, etc.)
      • Collect rocks or leaves from outside and let students think of creative ways to put the objects into groups. (i.e.: size, color, shape, texture) Ask students to explain why they chose the grouping they chose.

    Library

      • What are the differences between fiction, nonfiction and biography?
      • Do you know the parts of a book? Can you identify the spine, the title page and the front and back covers? Does your nonfiction book have a glossary, a table of contents and an index? How does this help you find information quickly?
      • Can you arrange your books in alphabetical order by the author’s last name? Can you group your nonfiction books by subject?
      • Find online books
        • See list of resources on KIBE website

     

    • Grades 3-5

    Reading

      • Have your student read a “just right” book daily for 15-30 minutes
      • Read aloud to your student and ask comprehension questions such as:
        • What are you picturing as you read/hear this text?
        • What are you wondering about?
        • What has happened so far? / What have you learned so far?
      • English Learners: Continue to speak, read and write in the language that is most comfortable at home.

    Writing

      • After reading a book or portion of a book, select one prompt to respond to:
        • Write about what happened in the story.
        • Write about your favorite part and tell why you selected that part.
        • Write about what might happen next in the story.
        • Write a story.

    Mathematics

    This is a great time to share with your student that math is everywhere. Grade 3-5 students should spend 10 minutes/day for math games and/or workbook practice.

      • Measure, count, and record. Count how many jumping jacks or pushups can be done and how long it takes – or how long it takes to do 10 or 20. Play around with doubling or halving the time. Use non-standard tools, like a shoe, to count how far someone can jump – calculate how far 10, 15, or 20 jumps might take you.
      • Build something together. Big or small, any project that involves measuring includes counting, adding, and multiplying. It doesn’t matter whether you’re making a clubhouse out of shoeboxes or building a genuine tree house.
      • Involve your student in the shopping. Talk about prices as you shop and estimate the cost by rounding to friendly numbers or use a calculator for more accuracy.
      • Look at coins and determine how old they are using the date. Sort them from oldest to newest coin. Find the sum of their ages. Find the difference between the oldest and the newest. If you have a large collection of coins arrange them into a bar graph based on year or location where they were minted. What is the most or least common year or location?
      • Count things and generalize to larger sets. Count how many beans are in one cup and estimate how many are in a larger bag. Count how many students are in their class and estimate how many students are home from their school or from the school district.
      • Mathematize reading time. Most children’s books are ripe with opportunities to notice shapes, count objects, compare two things, notice how things change and grow, and to make predictions about what is going to happen based on the information we already have!

    Science

      • Keep a “Spring Changes” journal by making daily observations of the weather, plants, and animal changes that occur as the spring approaches. Draw pictures and write about what evidence you see of the coming spring season. Record the questions you have.
      • Using household items, design and build the tallest free-standing structure you can build.

    Library

      • How are books arranged in a library? Can you arrange your books by the author’s last names? Can you arrange the nonfiction books by subject?
      • Why is a table of contents, an index and a glossary important in a nonfiction book?
      • Can you tell the difference between an autobiography and a biography?
      • Using an online resource try to find information on a topic of your choice
        • Refer to KIBE resources for families and students

     

    • Grades 6-8

    Reading

      • Suggested reading time for middle school students is 30-45 minutes a day.
      • Questions to consider while you read:
        • What questions do you have about the text?
        • What inferences and/or predictions are you making as you read?
        • What connections do you have to the text?
      • English Learners: Continue to speak, read and write in the language that is most comfortable at home.

    Writing

    Below are questions to consider during and after reading. Remember to use text evidence to support your responses.

      • What is the main idea or theme?
      • Who is the intended audience? How do you know?
      • How is the text structured or organized?
      • What is your connection to the text?
      • What is the author’s purpose and/or message?

    Mathematics

    Middle school students should spend 30 minutes/day for math review and games.

      • Have students consider the math they have done in middle school. Examples might be fractions, percent, ratios, solving proportions, proportional relationships, linear relationships, geometry, or any others. Have them record (pictures, video, drawing) places in their homes, or neighborhoods where they see this math happening. Have them write math problems about the math they see!
      • Game: 1-2 Nim o Instructions: Nim is a two-player game. Start with a pile of 10 counters (paper clips, dried pasta, coins, etc.). On your turn, remove one or two counters from the pile. You must take at least one counter on your turn, but you may not take more than two. Whoever takes the last counter wins. o Example Game: Start with 10 counters in the pile. Player A takes 2 counters, leaving 8. Player B takes one counter, leaving 7. Player A takes two counters, leaving 5. Player B takes one counter, leaving 4. Player A takes one counter, leaving 3. Player B takes one counter, leaving 2. Player A takes two counters, leaving 0 and winning the game.
        • After you play several games, start the conversation around the question, “How do you win?” Record data for different variations (starting with 1 counter, 2 counters, 3 counters, etc.) and see if you can figure out a strategy to always win.

    Science

      • Read a news source on the coronavirus daily.
        • Research the validity of the claims using expert sources, such as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), to identify inconsistencies.
        • Based on your readings, why does the CDC recommend you wash your hands for 20 seconds and not touch your eyes and nose?

    Library

      • Find a book that you and a friend have both read. Discuss your favorite parts of the book. Did the book have any relatable themes? Recommend a favorite book to three people and tell them why.
      • Explore current events using a database. How did you experience differ from using a book? Databases can be found at online at (see KIBE family and student resources)

     

     

    • Grados K-2º

    Lectura

      • Pídale a su estudiante que lea un libro "adecuado" todos los días por 15-30 minutos
      • Léale en voz alta a su estudiante y hágale preguntas de comprensión como:
        • ¿Qué estás imaginando mientras lees / escuchas este texto?
        • ¿Qué te estás preguntando?
        • ¿Qué ha pasado hasta ahora? / ¿Qué has aprendido hasta ahora?
      • Estudiantes de Inglés: Continúen hablando, leyendo y escribiendo en el idioma que les sea más cómodo en casa.

    Escritura

      • Después de leer un libro o una parte de un libro, seleccionen una indicación para responder:
        • Escribe sobre lo que sucedió en la historia.
        • Escribe sobre tu parte favorita y explica por qué seleccionaste esa parte.
        • Escribe sobre lo que podría pasar después de la historia.
        • Escribe una historia.

    Matemáticas

    Este es un buen momento para compartir con su estudiante que las matemáticas están en todas partes. Los estudiantes de K-2º grado deben pasar 10 minutos por día para repasar las matemáticas y juegos o práctica en un libro de ejercicios.

      • Cuenta Todo: Contar es una actividad eficaz que los estudiantes pueden hacer en cualquier lugar.
      • Cuenta de diferentes maneras, de 2 en 2, 5 en 5, 10 en 10. Comienza a contar desde diferentes números, no sólo desde cero. Celebra los números de referencia – Aplaude o brinca cuando llegues a múltiplos de 10 como 10, 20, 30 etc.
      • ¡Juega a la tienda! Cuenta mientras almacenan estantes o intercambian y cuentan dinero de mentiras.
      • Hablen sobre Formas: Busquen, clasifiquen y cuenten formas en su hogar. ¿Cuántos círculos puedes encontrar, cuántos rectángulos y cuántos de ellos son cuadrados?
      • Mide todo. Usa herramientas no estándar como un zapato o incluso tu mano para medir qué tan alta es una mesa o qué tan lejos puedes saltar.
      • Señala las fracciones –  comparte cosas - como una lata de sopa - entre las personas. Cada persona obtiene una 1/2 o 1/3. ¡Observa cómo este nuevo tipo de número es menor que uno, pero mayor que ninguno!
      • ¡Lee Historias! Añadan matemáticas al tiempo de lectura. ¡La mayoría de los libros para niños están llenos de oportunidades para descubrir formas, contar objetos, comparar dos cosas, observar cómo cambian y crecen las cosas, y hacer predicciones sobre lo que sucederá en base a la información que ya tenemos!
      • Miren las monedas y determinen qué tan antiguas son al mirar la fecha. Coloquen las monedas por orden desde la más antigua hasta la más nueva. Si tienen una gran colección de monedas, organícelas en una gráfica de barras según el año o el lugar donde fueron acuñadas. ¿Cuál es el año o el lugar más común?

    Ciencias

      • Sal al exterior y haz observaciones. Busca pruebas de hábitats de animal (es decir: telarañas, nidos de pájaros, huellas de animales u hojas con marcas de picaduras de insectos, etc.)
      • Busca pruebas de primavera en las plantas (es decir, flores, brotes, hojas nuevas, etc.)
      • Coleccionen rocas u hojas del exterior y deje que los estudiantes piensen en formas creativas de poner los objetos en grupos. (es decir: tamaño, color, forma, textura) Pídale al estudiante que explique por qué eligieron la agrupación que eligieron.

    Biblioteca

      • ¿Cuáles son las diferencias entre ficción, no ficción y biografía?
      • ¿Conoces las partes de un libro? ¿Puedes identificar el lomo del libro, la página del título y las portadas y contraportadas? ¿Tu libro de no ficción tiene un glosario, una tabla de contenido y un índice? ¿Cómo te ayuda esto a encontrar información rápidamente?
      • ¿Puedes organizar tus libros en orden alfabético según el apellido del autor? ¿Puedes agrupar tus libros de no ficción por tema?
      • Encuentra libros en línea
        • Consulta la lista de recursos en el sitio web de KIBE

     

    • Grados 3º-5º

    Lectura

      • Pídale a su estudiante que lea un libro “adecuado” todos los días por 15-30 minutos
      • Léale en voz alta a su estudiante y hágale preguntas de comprensión tales como:
        • ¿Qué estás imaginando mientras lees/escuchas este texto?
        • ¿Qué te estás preguntando?
        • ¿Qué ha pasado hasta ahora? / ¿Qué has aprendido hasta ahora?
      • Estudiantes de inglés: Continúen hablando, leyendo y escribiendo en el idioma que les sea más cómodo en casa.

    Escritura

      • Después de leer un libro o una parte de un libro, seleccionen una indicación para contestar:
        • Escribe sobre lo que sucedió en la historia.
        • Escribe sobre tu parte favorita y explica por qué seleccionaste esa parte.  
        • Escribe sobre lo que podría pasar después de la historia.
        • Escribe una historia.

    Matemáticas

    Este es un buen momento para compartir con su estudiante que las matemáticas están en todas partes. Los estudiantes de 3º-5º grado deben pasar 10 minutos por día para repasar las matemáticas y juegos o práctica en un libro de ejercicios.

      • Medir, contar y registrar. Cuenten cuántos saltos o flexiones se pueden hacer y cuánto tiempo se lleva, o cuánto tiempo se lleva para hacer 10 o 20. Juega hacer doblar o reducir el tiempo a la mitad. Usa herramientas no estándar, como un zapato, para contar qué tan lejos puede saltar alguien: calcula qué tan lejos te puede llevar 10, 15 o 20 saltos.
      • Construyan algo juntos. Grande o pequeño, cualquier proyecto que implique medir incluye contar, sumar y multiplicar. No importa si estás haciendo una casa club con cajas de zapatos o si estás construyendo una casa en un árbol.
      • Involucre a su estudiante en las compras. Hable sobre los precios mientras hace las compras y calculen los precios redondeando los números o usen la calculadora para mayor precisión.
      • Miren las monedas y determinen que tan antiguas son al mirar la fecha. Coloquen las monedas por orden desde la más antigua hasta la más nueva. Encuentren la suma de los años de existencia. Encuentren la diferencia entre la moneda más antigua y la más nueva. Si tiene una gran colección de monedas, organícelas en una gráfica de barras según el año o el lugar donde fueron acuñadas. ¿Cuál es el año o el lugar más o menos común? 
      • Cuenten cosas y generalicen a conjuntos más grandes. Cuenten cuántos frijoles hay en una taza y calculen cuántos hay en una bolsa más grande. Cuenten cuántos estudiantes hay en su clase y calculen cuántos estudiantes están en casa de su escuela o del distrito escolar.
      • Añada matemáticas al tiempo lectura. ¡La mayoría de los libros para niños están llenos de oportunidades para descubrir formas, contar objetos, comparar dos cosas, observar cómo cambian y crecen las cosas, y hacer predicciones sobre lo que sucederá en base a la información que ya tenemos!

    Ciencias

      • Mantén un diario de "Cambios de Primavera" haciendo observaciones diarias del clima, las plantas y los cambios de animales que ocurren a medida que se acerca la primavera. Hagan dibujos y escriban sobre qué evidencia ven de la próxima temporada de primavera. Registra las preguntas que tienes.
      • Usando artículos del hogar, diseña y construye la estructura independiente más alta que puedas construir.

    Biblioteca

      • ¿Cómo se organizan los libros en una biblioteca? ¿Puedes organizar tus libros según los apellidos del autor? ¿Puedes organizar los libros de no ficción por tema?
      • ¿Por qué es importante una tabla de contenido, un índice y un glosario en un libro de no ficción?
      • ¿Puedes notar la diferencia entre una autobiografía y una biografía?
      • Usando un recurso en línea intenta encontrar información sobre un tema de tu elección.
        • Consulta los recursos de KIBE para familias y estudiantes

     

    • Grados 6º-8º

    Lectura

      • El tiempo de lectura sugerido para estudiantes de escuela intermedia es de 30-45 minutos al día.
      • Preguntas para considerar mientras lees:
        • ¿Qué preguntas tienes sobre el texto?
        • ¿Qué inferencias o predicciones estás haciendo mientras lees?
        • ¿Qué conexiones tienes con el texto?
      • Estudiantes de inglés: Continúen hablando, leyendo y escribiendo en el idioma que les sea más cómodo en casa.  

    Escritura

    A continuación, hay preguntas para considerar durante y después de leer. Recuerda usar evidencia textual para apoyar tus respuestas.

      • ¿Cuál es la idea principal o el tema?
      • ¿Quién es la audiencia a la que está dirigido? ¿Cómo lo sabes?
      • ¿Cómo se estructura u organiza el texto?
      • ¿Cuál es tu conexión con el texto?
      • ¿Cuál es el propósito o el mensaje del autor?

    Los estudiantes de Escuela Intermedia deben pasar 30 minutos por día para repasar las matemáticas y juegos.

      • Pídale a su estudiante que considere las matemáticas que ha hecho en la escuela intermedia. Los ejemplos pueden ser fracciones, porcentajes, proporciones, resolución de proporciones, relaciones proporcionales, relaciones lineales, geometría o cualquier otro. Pídale que grabe (fotos, videos, dibujos) lugares en sus hogares o vecindarios donde vean que suceden estas matemáticas. ¡Pídales que escriban problemas matemáticos sobre las matemáticas que ven!     
      • Juego: 1-2 Nim o Instrucciones: Nim es un juego de dos jugadores. Comienza con un montón de 10 fichas (sujetapapeles, pasta seca, monedas, etc.). Cuando sea tu turno, elimina una o dos fichas del montón. Debes tomar al menos una ficha en tu turno, pero no puedes tomar más de dos. Quien tome la última ficha gana. o Ejemplo de juego: Comienza con 10 fichas en el montón. El jugador A toma 2 fichas, dejando 8. El jugador B toma una ficha, dejando 7. El jugador A toma dos fichas, dejando 5. El jugador B toma una ficha, dejando 4. El jugador A toma una ficha, dejando 3. El jugador B toma una ficha, dejando 2. El jugador A toma dos fichas, dejando 0 y ganando el juego.
        • Después de jugar varios juegos, comienza la conversación alrededor de la pregunta "¿Cómo se gana?" Registra datos para diferentes variaciones (comenzando con 1 ficha, 2 fichas, 3 fichas, etc.) y mira si puedes encontrar una estrategia para ganar siempre.  

    Ciencias

      • Lee diariamente una fuente de noticias sobre el coronavirus.
        • Investiga la validez de las declaraciones utilizando fuentes expertas, tal como los Centros para el Control de Enfermedades (CDC, siglas en inglés), para identificar inconsistencias.
        • Según tus lecturas, ¿por qué los CDC recomiendan que se lave las manos durante 20 segundos y no se toque los ojos ni la nariz?  

    Biblioteca

      • Busca un libro que tú y un amigo hayan leído. Habla sobre tus partes favoritas del libro. ¿El libro tenía temas relacionados? Recomienda un libro favorito a tres personas y diles por qué.
      • Explora los eventos actuales usando una base de datos. ¿Cómo fue diferente tu experiencia de usar un libro? Las bases de datos se pueden encontrar en línea en (ver KIBE family and student resources)